Energy healing for our world
 
Sanación energética para nuestro mundo
  

 
  
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Since my teens I have written poetry. I have read Japanese haiku in the past but last year I was encouraged to write poetry in this Japanese style. The convention for this poetic form is strict. It consists of 3 lines, in syllable counts of 5, 7 & 5.
 
An extension of haiku is the tanka, consisting of 5 lines, in syllable counts of 5, 7, 5, 7 & 7.
 
A haibun combines a tanka followed by a short piece of prose which develops the theme of the tanka. This may be from less than 100 words up to 300 or so.
 
I love the disciplne that these poetic forms demand - concise thought and sharp expression to capture images in such a space. My haibuns usually have a prose section of under 100 words. They seem to fit me like a glove.
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                   Returning to Buddha
 
Following my heart
I became lost in shadow
Then my heart called
I turned towards the light
Shining as bright as ever
  
Am I?
 
       Truly I am not
       So how can I feel so raw?
       The sun shines brightly
 
 
                                                Afternoon Coffee
 
Sun soaked glass, warm
Coffee steams on my table
Swaying palms outside
Afternoon voices softly hum
Coffee in Argentina
 
Sitting back in an easy chair, still and warm inside. Fresh coffee and strawberry tart awaiting. Beyond the glass, palms sway in a rippling breeze. Late sun is sinking over traffic homeward bound as hawkers ply their wares on the red lights – just seconds to make a sale. Three cyclists stroll in, lycra clad and glistening – a nucleus of bright energy against a sleepy backdrop of murmuring lazy voices. Most customers and the serving girls are winding down. Argentina in the afternoon; coffee, cake and company.